Yamaha SVC-110SK Silent Electric Cello Review

The electric cello is a fascinating instrument. It offers the ability to practice and play silently without annoying neighbors for those who play acoustic cello as well as a completely unique playing experience in its own right for those willing to experiment. The Yamaha SVC-110SK is a popular intermediate electric cello with some unique features.

Things To Consider Before Buying An Electric Cello

Electric cellos can vary a lot in their form factor because some try to imitate a classical cello shape while others look abstract and original. There are other important differences as well: active vs passive pickups, the number and type of ports, whether there is onboard effects or EQ, and so on.

The Yamaha SVC-110SK

The 110SK is in the middle of the market as far as electric cellos are priced in general. It has a close balance between its features and the price tag, and it is well-suited to many different roles from performance to recording and home practice. This versatility is a large part of what makes the 110SK appealing, because regardless of whether you are looking to supplement your acoustic cello play or you are fully committed to going electric, the 110SK has an attractive feature set and a good base tone. The 110SK is lightweight and easy to transport. The parts and the design all began in Germany as part of their in-house production process. The makers incorporate items of good quality to ensure a pleasant play experience no matter the genre.

  • Versatility
  • Strong tone
  • Good value
  • Volume control not tight
  • Nontraditional design
  • Features could be better

Features and Benefits

Ports

Yamaha SVC-110SK Silent Electric Cello

It is becoming increasingly common for electric instruments to have a few different ports. The 110SK has three main ones: a headphone out port, master out for an instrument cable, and aux in for accompaniment or other needs. This is a generous and practical arrangement because it doesn't go overboard but it allows for several different uses for those who need them. The ports open up several different roles like recording, performance, and practice, and you have control over the quality of the amps or headphones you want to use for playback.

Sound

The base tone of the 110SK sounds highly realistic and accurate. This isn't always easy to achieve and it makes the 110SK that much better of a practice instrument. It's also comparatively easy to add effects if you want to modify the signal in any way. Speaking of effects, the 110SK comes with 3 different reverb effects to experiment with. A foot pedal or other source will probably have a better reverb, but those cost extra.

Durability

Although it looks like it is on the flimsy side, the 110SK is actually fairly tough. It doesn't have an interior soundhole for resonance, so it doesn't need to be fully hollow. The thin profile means it is harder to jostle and bump it, especially with a hardshell case.

Design

The 110SK is a good-looking instrument. It has a beautiful finish, elegant curves, and bouts that are striking, yet still fit into the style of the cello. The thin shape emphasizes how long the cello is while drawing attention to the tuning pegs and the bridge, which are key areas because they mark the location of the tone adjustment and the pickup, respectively.

Ratings

Design

5

Performance

4

Construction

5

Value for the Money

4

User Satisfaction

5

Alternatives

Yamaha SVC-210SK Silent Cello

Yamaha SVC-210SK Silent Cello

The best place to start when looking for an alternative is with another Yamaha instrument, the SVC-210SK. As the model number suggests this is a very similar cello. The biggest difference is that the form factor is somewhat different and the bouts are collapsible. This makes the 201SK significantly more portable and easy to pack up. For players who do a lot of traveling, this is a key feature that can preserve the lifetime of the cello.

Comparison

Yamaha SVC-210SK

Price: $2770

Pickups: Active

Features: Aux in, headphones and main out, reverb, collapsible bouts

Yamaha SVC-110SK

Price: $2500

Pickups: Active

Features: Aux in, headphones and main out, reverb,

NS Design CR6 Cello

NS Design CR6 Cello

NS Design is the other major producer of electric cellos. The CR6 is one of their flagship models. It's packed with good features like an electronics system built by EMG that includes onboard EQ and a preamp, a headphone jack, a removable tripod, and a piezo pickup with vertical and horizontal modes. It's a great instrument but costs an additional $500.

Comparison

NS Design CR6 

Price: $3500

Pickups: Active

Features: Headphones and main out, active preamp, EMG electronics, 2-band EQ

Yamaha SVC-110SK

Price: $2500

Pickups: Active

Features: Aux in, headphones and main out, reverb,

Cecilio 4/4 CECO-4BK

Cecilio 4/4 CECO-4BK

At the other end of the spectrum the CECO-4BK from Cecilio is a budget-friendly option that comes in at about $320, a bargain among electric cellos. The sound isn't quite as good, and it has nothing in the way of special features aside from a gig bag, headphones, and a bow. It's an acceptable choice for the price alone but might need to be upgraded later if you want to continue with the electric cello.

Comparison

Cecilio 4/4 CECO

Price: $320

Pickups: Active

Features: Aux in, headphones and main out, gig bag

Yamaha SVC-110SK

Price: $2500

Pickups: Active

Features: Aux in, headphones and main out, reverb,

Final Thoughts

Electric cellos have a lot to offer and a surprising depth in their feature sets. Whether you are an acoustic player who needs a way to practice quietly or you want to try the electric cello on its separate merits, the instruments in this post all have something to offer. They also each fit into a different budget range, but they all represent good deals and a good investment. Make sure to check out our reviews and guide for electric cello

Stephanie Su
 

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