Yamaha P71 88-Key Weighted Action Digital Piano Review

Digital keyboards piano is an appealing way to get started or to continue learning to play the piano. They also usually have extra features like recording, multiple voices, demos, and anything else the manufacturer wants to add. The Yamaha P71 is an example of an entry-level digital piano worth your consideration for a purchase.

Things to Consider Before Purchasing a Keyboards Piano

The most important thing to plan out is what you will do with the digital piano, because that affects which features you want. Things like recording tools, lots of sounds, a USB port, and other elements might be attractive to different people for different reasons. Finding a digital piano with high-quality samples and the right features is the key to getting the most value out of it.

The Yamaha P71

The P71 starts at $400 and has a starter bundle that adds a bench as well as a deluxe bundle that also adds a stand. It is portable, weighing about 25 pounds, and it provides a sampling of Yamaha's higher-end features in an inexpensive package. It's one of the best value options up until around $800, when more digital pianos have superior feature sets as well as samples.

  • This piano offers two different piano sounds so you can get the sound that matches your needs
  • Excellent value
  • Portable
  • Samples not as good as mid-level digital pianos
  • Lacking in ports
  • The high-end on the volume spectrum isn't as loud as some other pianos

Features and Benefits

Voices

Yamaha P71 88-Key Weighted Action Digital Piano

The P71 has 10 different voices: two pianos, two organs, a harpsichord, strings, and more. Furthermore, the Dual Voice feature makes it possible to activate two different voices at once, so one keystroke plays two sounds. This promotes some creative songwriting and composition. The voices all use samples of fair quality, but there is a noticeable step up in this quality at higher-end models that have more memory.

Piano Feel

One area where Yamaha really excels is the ability to make their digital pianos feel like analog ones when you strike the keys. That is due to the Graded Hammer System, which makes the bass keys feel heavier than the treble ones. The feature makes it possible to use experience playing on analog piano or practice playing on the P71 and have that experience carry over to a full piano. Other pianos have evenly weighted keys, which is less realistic. The size and width of the P71 are also piano-like. This, combined with the portability, makes the P71 ideal for practicing on the road.

Value

The P71 has a significantly better set of samples and features than most digital pianos that cost $400. The level of quality is closer to a $600 and over piano, especially the dual voice system. Considering that the middle of the market tops out at around $800, getting a good deal at half that price is highly appealing. The P71 is an Amazon-exclusive model, so that also provides a way to save on shipping, further improving the value of the item. The additional bundles to add a stand and bench are not necessary if you already have those items or something to use as an equivalent.

​Rating

Design

4

Performance

4

Construction

4

Value for the Money

5

User Satisfaction

5

Alternatives

Williams Rhapsody 2

Williams Rhapsody 2

The Williams Rhapsody 2 costs $450, so just a little more than the P71. For the extra money, you get an included stand, 2 more voices, and a system to add a different type of effect depending on which voice you are currently using. It has a USB port that can connect to MIDI inputs. The Rhapsody 2 does not have much in the way of additional features. It makes up for that fact with a slightly better set of samples and the included stand.

Comparison

Williams Rhapsody 2

Price: $450

Voices: 12

Extra Features: USB port

Yamaha P71

Price: $400

Voices: 10

Extra Features: Dual Voice Mode

Korg B1SP

Korg B1SP

The B1SP from Korg costs $600 and comes with a stand, a bench, and a set of three pedals that includes damper, sustain, and soft. It has 8 voices: 5 pianos, 2 organs, and a harpsichord. It can also alter the weighting of the keys depending on which register you would be playing in if it was an analog piano to better match the weight of analog keys.

Comparison

Korg B1SP

Price: $600

Voices: 8

Extra Features: Headphone port

Yamaha P71

Price: $400

Voices: 10

Extra Features: Dual Voice Mode

Casio Privia PX160GD

Casio Privia PX160GD

The PX160GD costs $500. It has 18 voices and 8 different effects plus a tone adjustor. It also comes with a sustain pedal and a scaled hammer system for altering the resistance of each key. The sample quality is not quite as good as on the Yamaha P71. It has two line inputs, a USB port, and 2 headphone ports.

Comparison

Casio PX160GD

Price: $500

Voices: 10

Extra Features: USB, 2x line in, and 2x headphone ports

Yamaha P71

Price: $400

Voices: 10

Extra Features: Dual Voice Mode

Final Thoughts

At this price range, the sample quality and number of voices tend to be the biggest factors that separate two different models of digital piano. If possible, it would be helpful to try to hear the instrument in person. They might be in stock at a local music store. Failing that, Youtube videos are often good ways to hear how the samples sound. The Yamaha P71 stands out from the rest of the crowd due to its sample quality and low price. In value terms, it simply outpaces the rest of the category. We selected the best keyboards piano brands and you may just find the perfect pianos that meets your needs here.

Stephanie Su
 

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