Yamaha DTX400K Customizable Electronic Drum Set Review

Not long ago I decided to trade in my acoustic kit for an electronic drum set after moving into an apartment in the city. I settled on Yamaha’s DTX400K, a solid electronic kit to get started with that balanced quality with a price tag that didn’t break the bank. In this guide, I’ll walk you through everything you need to know about the DTX400K as well as outline some alternatives.

Things To Consider Before Buying An Electronic Drum Set

An electronic drum set can be a great alternative for drummers who need to be able to control their volume output. It is very difficult, if not impossible to play an acoustic drum set at low volume level, as the striking of the drums just produces a loud sound. For drummers who live in apartment complexes or shared housing, the ability to turn down the volume or play with headphones is a huge advantage.

The Yamaha DTX400K

The Yamaha DTX400K is an eight piece electronic kit that includes a snare, kick drum, hi hat with control pedal, two overhead cymbals and three tom pads. Also included is the DTX400K drum module with ten drum kit presets and 297 drum samples, one pair of Vic Firth drumsticks and a pair of tascam headphones.

The DTX400K is a great kit for drummers looking to get starting with an electronic drum set, due to its low price, realistic drum pads and quality assembly. Yamaha has set its price point low enough to fit within most drummer’s budgets, making it a perfect starter kit for experienced musicians or newcomers looking to get their first electronic drum set.

Pros

  • Drums heads have a realistic feel to them
  • Includes ten professional drum presets and 297 high quality samples
  • Compact setup

Cons

  • App is only available for iPhone users
  • Kick pedal may move about during play
  • Snare doesn’t allow for rim shots

Features & Benefits

Build

Yamaha DTX400K Customizable Electronic Drum Set

Yamaha has put in the necessary legwork to make sure the DTX400K is a well put together drum set, utilizing quality materials that are both durable and great for performance. The included drum throne is comfortable and well made, so you won’t have to worry about it falling apart underneath you during a practice session. The kit itself fits on a compact drum rack that is assembled fairly naturally, and uses solid materials in its construction. All in all, Yamaha struck the right balance between the DTX400K’s build quality and its middle of the road pricing.

Performance

The DTX400K performs surprisingly well, especially considering it falls below the high end price bracket as far as electronic drum sets go. The drum pads have a realistic feeling to them that won’t be too jarring for drummers who are used to playing on acoustic sets, with the cymbals featuring multiple strike zones to mimic the dynamic nature of their acoustic counterparts. The included headphones are a nice touch as well and are sure to please customers who picked up the set as a way to keep their noise level down when practicing. All in all, Yamaha has delivered a solid drum set that most drummers should find enjoyable to play.

Sound

The included DTX400K sound module comes packed with 10 drum kit presets and 297 drum samples, giving the drummer the ability to design their own kits and save them as additional presets. The included drum sets are based off various types of acoustic kits, and with a total of just ten kits the DTX400K has fewer presets than the average electronic drum set comes with. That being said, there are still plenty of samples to play around with and the factory presets are of high quality and should provide countless hours of drumming fun.

Rating

Design

3.5

Performance

3.5

Construction

3

Value for the Money

4

User Satisfaction

4.5

Alternatives

Alesis DM10 Studio Kit

Compared to the DTX400K, the Alesis Strike DM10 is a bit more high end, as reflected in its higher price tag. The Strike kit features the same number of drum pads, though they have been designed to feel as realistic as possible with real head on the snare, toms and kick drum, with the cymbals being very versatile. The included DM10 module comes with 100 drum kits and more than 1,000 samples, giving the drummer a much wider sonic palette to choose from.

Compared to Yamaha DTX400K:

  • More expensive
  • Greater performance capabilities
  • More included sounds

Roland TD-1KV V-Drums

Roland TD-1KV V-Drums

Roland’s TD-1KV V-drums are another great alternative to the DTX400K. The V-drums are a little bit more expensive, while offering mostly the same features. This kit features the same number of drum pads, including a mesh head snare pad, as well as 15 drum kit presets. The budget is increased slightly, but doesn’t come with too many features not available on Yamaha’s offering.

Compared to Yamaha DTX400K:

  • Five more drum presets
  • Same number of drum pads
  • Slightly more expensive

Pyle PED041

Pyle PED041

The last alternative we will cover is the Pyle PED041. This is the budget friendly option, costing considerably less than the DTX400K without sacrificing too many features. The construction on this set is quite a bit cheaper, resulting in a less realistic performance with fewer drum pads. There are no cymbal pads included with this kit, though Pyle does up the ante by offering a double bass pedal.

Compared to Yamaha DTX400K:

  • Less expensive
  • Features less drum pads
  • Double kick pedal included
  • Not as realistic feeling to play

Final Thoughts

For the money, Yamaha’s DTX400K is a great electronic drum set with plenty of value. It doesn’t have a huge number of kit presets, but it comes loaded with plenty of drum samples and the build quality and performability of the kit make it an ideal starting point for drummers looking to branch out into the world of electronic percussion instruments.

Stephanie Su
 

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