Williams Symphony Grand Digital Piano Review

The Williams Symphony Grand Digital Piano is an advanced model of digital piano. It has a collection of high-resolution samples, a large number of voices, accompaniment styles, and much more. It is a high-end digital grand piano that has exceptional quality for those willing to pay for it.

Things To Consider Before Buying A Digital Piano

Digital pianos all have different features. Some emphasize replicating analog pianos, others provide accompaniment tools, and still others promote recording and connecting to a computer. You need to decide what features you need and what balance you want to strike between quality and price. The features, the included extras, the onboard storage, quality of the samples-- all of these vary between digital pianos.

The Williams Symphony Grand

The Symphony is one of the highest-quality and most expensive offerings from Williams. It costs $1,500. It combines many of the features in lesser Williams models with top-notch samples and additional connectivity. The Symphony has a large selection of learning tools along with its performance features. This includes some prerecorded songs and lessons and access to a cloud-based educational system for further learning.

  • Excellent samples
  • Many features
  • Six speakers
  • High price
  • No modulation effect

Features and Benefits

Sound

Williams Symphony Grand Digital Piano

The Symphony has 174 voices and 120 styles to use for playback and accompaniment. The samples for the piano voices come from an Italian piano and are part of the Williams Custom Sound Library. Williams made a major investment in collecting samples and building the Symphony with enough memory to store them, as well as speakers that minimize distortion and other intrusive effects. This allows the quality to shine through both via the speakers and in recordings.

Feature Set

The Symphony is filled with features. It has weighted-action keys for realistic play, automatic accompaniment with the included styles, Bluetooth, USB, MIDI, splitting, layering, recording over two tracks, a metronome, and headphone connectivity. Nearly all of these features are present on one Williams digital piano or another, but not all at once and not of such depth. There is also an included bench that matches the aesthetics of the digital piano. Williams added software to reproduce sympathetic resonance, key noise, pedal noise, and other aspects of piano play for additional realism.

Value

It isn't easy to talk about value when it comes to a digital piano that costs $1,500, but it's an important conversation. The thing to understand is that this is the top of the line. For this large investment, Williams has included all of their best features, significant upgradability via USB and Bluetooth, and their best library of samples and voices. This is not a digital piano for a first-time player, although it does have learning tools. To take full advantage of the Symphony, it's important to have piano or keyboard experience. It is too expensive for someone just starting out, but just right for a long-term, permanent solution to someone who has been playing for a while and wants the best bang for their buck.

​Review

Design

5

Performance

5

Construction

4

Value for the Money

4

User Satisfaction

5

Alternatives

Suzuki MDG-300 Micro

Suzuki MDG-300 Micro

At $1,800, the MDG-300 from Suzuki is a small upgrade in a few ways compared to the Symphony. It has a slightly greater polyphony and can record on 3 tracks rather than 2. It also has wireless data transfer to its 24MB of storage. The MDG-300 stores its data in an SD card. If you want more polyphony or a higher number of tracks, the MDG-300 might be worth the extra money. You might also prefer the samples on the MDG-300. Try testing them out together to see if you notice any useful differences in the sound, playability, or appearance.

Comparison

Suzuki MDG-300 Micro

Price: $1,800

Voices: Adjustable

Features: Higher polyphony, better recording

Williams Symphony

Price: $1,500

Voices: 174

Features: Auto accompaniment, layering, splitting, recording

Suzuki MDG-400

Suzuki MDG-400

At $3,000, the MDG-400 is starting to become too expensive to justify. It has a true-color LCD screen, iPad compatibility, and the ability to record to an SD card for convenience. A lot of the price difference comes from hand-made parts in the frame and exterior of the piano. If you place a high value on the appearance and design, then this is the right upgrade to make. On features alone it doesn't give good value. You can use wireless, Bluetooth, or a port to play any music source through the MDG-400's speakers, just like on the 300.

Comparison

Suzuki MDG-400

Price: $3,000

Voices: Adjustable

Features: Hand-made frame

Williams Symphony

Price: $1,500

Voices: 174

Features: Auto accompaniment, layering, splitting, recording

Suzuki MDG-330 Mini

Suzuki MDG-330 Mini

The MDG-330 is in between the 300 and the 400 in size. It is called a "Mini" while the 300 is a "Micro" and the 400 is a "Baby." It has the same features as the other entrants in the MDG line, but the size difference is significant. The Baby is 40 x 64.75 x 54 inches, the Mini is 40 x 48 x 69 inches, and the Micro is 24 x 60 x 36 inches. Smaller sizes are easier to store, but produce less sound.

Comparison

Suzuki MDG-330

Price: $2000

Voices: Adjustable

Features: Higher polyphony, better recording

Williams Symphony

Price: $1,500

Voices: 174

Features: Auto accompaniment, layering, splitting, recording

Final Thoughts

The Williams Symphony isn't alone in the high-end digital piano market, but it does offer a relative bargain in terms of pricing. Comparable digital pianos tend to cost more without major upgrades in features or sound quality. Examine the list of alternatives to see if any seem interesting. For more best digital grand piano guide and review, you can visit our homepage.

Stephanie Su
 

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