Suzuki MDG-400 Baby Digital Grand Piano Review

Digital pianos range widely in price and quality. The advanced end of the market for digital pianos over $1000 is highly competitive. These pianos have high-quality samples, a deep array of features, and carefully designed forms. The MDG-400 from Suzuki is one of the leading examples of this type of digital grand piano.

What To Consider Before Buying A Digital Grand Piano

Digital pianos can vary quite a lot because there are many different features and attributes that they can have. Their main purpose is for learning and practicing. For some digital pianos this means trying to replicate the sound and feel of a full piano, while for others it means including many different simulated instruments to help with planning out songs.

The Suzuki MDG-400

The 400 is one of the most expensive digital pianos that Suzuki sells at $3,000. For that price, it includes many different features and a design that mimics an analog piano, but with a smaller physical footprint. For those who are looking to spend big on a home piece, the 400 has an appealing profile and some extras that justify the high price tag.

  • Versatile features
  • Beautiful design
  • Very good samples
  • Not portable
  • Quite expensive

Features and Benefits

Sound and Playback

Suzuki MDG-400 Baby Digital Grand Piano

The 400 has a selection of hundreds of voices with room to download more. The sample quality is high, especially for the piano voices. It has a polyphony of 128 and a selection of reverb and chorus effects, plus an equalizer. In addition to that, the 400 has a set of six large speakers, two each for treble, mids, and bass, which provide depth, detail, and sheer volume. The end result is magnificent sound and a high degree of control over the tone.

User Experience

Despite the high price, the 400 is actually fairly accessible to new players while retaining useful features for advanced users. For example, it comes with an SD card loaded with dozens of tutorial songs and it's possible to download more. It works easily with Bluetooth, wifi, and USB, so it can connect to almost anything. You can even play music through its speakers from a mobile device. It also includes a manual, lesson book, and songbook. The buttons and LCD screen make the system easy to navigate without requiring much study time or concentration, allowing you to focus on the music.

Value

The common trend for digital pianos is to either be loaded with features or have good piano samples. The MDG-400 manages both, and it comes in an exceptionally well-designed frame. The initial investment is very high and more than the vast majority of the other digital pianos available, but the investment comes with a serious increase in quality across the board. It has something for everyone and even works as a fairly good home audio system for parties or other events with its speakers, so it can promise a lot of value to some very different buyers.

​Rating

Design

5

Performance

5

Construction

4

Value for the Money

4

User Satisfaction

5

Alternatives

Suzuki MDG-330

Suzuki MDG-330

At $2500 the MDG-330 is somewhat cheaper than the 400. While the difference seems small relative to the total price, $500 is about the price of an entire midrange digital piano, so it makes a big difference. The 330 is much like the 400, with the same features and sound, but it is slightly smaller. The MDG-300 is even smaller than the 330, so both of these are good options if you don't have enough space for the 400.

Comparison

Suzuki MDG-330

Price: $2500

Voices: 200+

Features: Wifi, 6 speakers, tone control, onboard memory, mobile device connectivity and playback, mini size

Suzuki MDG-400

Price: $3000

Voices: 200+

Features: Wifi, 6 speakers, tone control, onboard memory, mobile device connectivity and playback

Williams Symphony

Williams Symphony

The Williams is a micro-sized digital piano like the MDG-300. It costs $1500. The Williams has some more realism features, like digital string resonance and pedal noise. It also has a different set of learning songs. However, there's no wifi and the speakers are not as large or detailed as on the 400. It is still an advanced and high-end digital piano but not as full-featured as the Suzuki line.

​Comparsion

Williams Symphony

Price: $1500

Voices: 174

Features: Tone control, onboard memory, micro size, digital resonance and pedal noise

Suzuki MDG-400

Price: $3000

Voices: 200+

Features: Wifi, 6 speakers, tone control, onboard memory, mobile device connectivity and playback

Yamaha YDP143R

Yamaha YDP143R

Yamaha tends towards instruments with lots of features and good sound, and the YDP143R is no exception. For $1100, it offers high-quality samples, synthetic ivory keys with realistic weighting, a wooden stand, an iOS app for controlling the features, and 10 voices. It is a piano-centric instrument with a few organ and harpsichord voices, and its main value is as a practice or composition platform for serious piano play.

Comparison

Yamaha YDP143R

Price: $1100

Voices: 10

Features: Realistic keys and action, high-quality samples

Suzuki MDG-400

Price: $3000

Voices: 200+

Features: Wifi, 6 speakers, tone control, onboard memory, mobile device connectivity and playback

Final Thoughts

The advanced digital pianos featured here might seem expensive, but they are meant to last for many years and provide the top quality of playing and listening experience. Each one has a unique profile for its features and sound, as well as price, so read each description to see which one appeals to you most. Don't forget to measure the space where they will go to make sure they fit. We also have other criteria of best digital grand pianos that will suits your preferences.

Stephanie Su
 

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