Gemeinhardt 2SP Flute Review

Whether it’s a younger band student or an adult looking to learn something new, the flute is a great instrument to learn. Even though it is easy to learn, advanced flute music is tricky and requires practice and skill. Players are kept interested throughout the entire process of learning the instrument. Getting started requires a solid beginner flute, and the Gemeinhardt 2SP Flute with Straight Headjoint is one of the most respected on the market.

Things to Consider Before Purchasing a Beginner Flute

Flutes generally come in one size, and both children and adults can play a standard flute with a straight headjoint. Younger children with small hands, usually those younger than ten, may need a curved headjoint or a modified instrument. There are three types of flutes on the market: student, intermediate, and professional. Most beginner players will start on student flutes and skip to professional flutes if they decide to play professionally or in university. Other major considerations include plateau keys, closed hole, or French keys, open hole and the material that the body and headjoint are made of.

The Gemeinhardt 2SP Flute

Gemeinhardt is one of the most respected flute brands, and their model 2SP is one of the most recommended student instruments. The 2SP is the top student model compared with the similar model 1SP. It is silver plated. Silver plating usually rests over a brass or nickel body underneath. The straight headjoin makes this instrument a standard sized flute for any player with hands large enough to reach the keys, typically those over ten, but some children may have to wait until they’re older. It also has an offset G, a feature that many beginner players find useful. As with most student flutes, this instrument also has plateau keys and a simple, undecorated design. Although it may not look special at first, it has a solid design that is both strong and repairable. This instrument comes with a plastic cleaning rod and a hard case.

Pros

  • Offset G
  • Plateau keys
  • Silver plating

Cons

  • C Foot
  • Student model that will have to be upgraded when player progresses
  • Simple, undecorated design

Features and Benefits

Silver Plating

Gemeinhardt 2SP Flute

Professional flutes are often made wholly or partly of solid silver with a tiny addition of copper to reduce the tarnishing properties and add strength, and some even have golden lip plates or headjoints. The reasoning behind using these precious metals is that they produce a better sound. Student and intermediate flutes, however, are typically made of brass or nickel and are silver plated. The silver plating gives the flute some of the tonal benefits of silver without the major added cost. Solid silver instruments are thousands of dollars more expensive than silver plated ones. This silver-plated flute provides a nice toned instrument with a reasonable price tag.

Plateau Keys

There are two types of keys on flutes, the plateau and the French. Plateau keys are also called closed hole keys because the keys on the instrument are solid. French keys are open, and the player has to cover the openings with their fingers in order to produce notes. While French keys are generally considered to have the best tone, they are often very difficult for beginner players. Some beginners do use plugs to make sure the holes are covered, but French key flutes are typically much more expensive than plateau key flutes. This flute has plateau keys to provide an affordable instrument that’s easy for beginners to play.

Offset G

The G key is the one where the ring finger on the left hand rests. There are two types of G keys: inline and offset. The inline G is one where that key is in line with the other keys. An offset G is just the opposite, it is set off from the other keys to make it easier to reach. Most flute players will find the offset G easier to use, and it is a common feature on student and professional model flutes alike. Some players may prefer the inline G, and its recommended that new players try both styles before deciding which one to purchase.

Rating:

Design

4

Performance

5

Construction

5

Value for the Money

5

User Satisfaction

4

Alternatives:

Yamaha YFL-221 Student Flute

Yamaha YFL-221 Student Flute

Yamaha is another highly respected brand in the flute world. The YFL-221 is a solid student instrument in that it is reliable, easy to play, and repairable. It comes with a silver-plated finish, plateau keys, C foot, and an offset G. This flute also has a simple design with unadorned keys and simple mechanisms. 

Compared to the Gemeinhardt:

  • Is silver-plated
  • C Foot
  • Offset G
  • Simple design
  • Plateau keys
  • More expensive
  • Comes with case and cleaning rod

Armstrong 104 Student Flute

Armstrong 104 Student Flute

The Armstrong 104 is one of the oldest and most beloved student flute models. A solid, dependable instrument, many young flute players have held onto their 104s long into adulthood. The 104 is similar to other student model instruments in that it has a silver-plated body, plateau keys, C foot, and offset G. 

Compared to the Gemeinhardt:

  • Is silver-plated
  • C Foot
  • Offset G
  • Simple design
  • Plateau keys
  • About the same price
  • Comes with case and cleaning rod

Pearl PF 500 Student Flute

Pearl PF 500 Student Flute

Pearl is another well-known flute maker. Their PF 500 is a solid student flute that features a C foot, offset G, and plateau keys. The silver plated body has French pointed keys, which look more polished and can have more fluid action than the simply designed keys on other student flutes. 

Compared to the Gemenhardt:

  • Is silver-plated
  • C Foot
  • Offset G
  • More elegantly designed French pointed keys
  • Plateau keys
  • About the same price
  • Comes with case and cleaning rod

Final Thoughts

While the sheer number of student flutes out there can be overwhelming, sticking to major brands, will provide a much easier experience. The extra money spent on a well-known brand can save hundreds of dollars in repair expenses down the line, and that’s assuming the cheaper instruments can be repaired at all. Those interested in learning the flute are advised to speak to a flute teacher before considering purchasing an instrument.

Stephanie Su
 

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 0 comments

Leave a Reply: