Casio Privia PX-160 88-Key Digital Piano Review

Choosing a beginner piano isn't always easy for someone with little experience. The task is made more challenging by an infinite number of models on the market. For the player who's on the market for a full-size portable piano with an authentic feel and high quality sound, the Casio Privia PX-160 is as close as you can get.

Things to Consider Before Buying a Digital Piano

There are a number of variables that determine the worth of a digital piano. Such include great keyboard action, sound quality and versatility, functions as well as connectivity. You will need a piano that offers an authentic feel, crisp sound, as many polyphony notes as you can afford. The ability to connect to headphones so that you can practice in private or to a computer so that you can record music would be great.

The Casio Privia PX-160 88- Key

The PX-160 is the bigger brother to the preceding PX-150 by the same company. It comes with all the features found in the PX-150 and more, promising enhanced performance and playing experience without pushing up the price significantly. Those with an eye for aesthetics will certainly appreciate the expanded color options. But is it a worthwhile advance on Casio's large lineup of pianos?

Pros

  • Quality sounds
  • Attention to detail
  • Authentic playing experience
  • Greater versatility

Cons

  • Pedal is somewhat weak and small
  • The non-piano voices are inauthentic, often sounding electronic or otherwise distorted, which further limits the Casio to a beginner designation

Features and Benefits

High quality keyboard

Casio Privia PX-160 88-Key Digital Piano

Casio has done a great job of installing a top quality keyboard in the PX-160. You get a Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard, which lends an acoustic sound. The 88 keys are weighted, meaning that the keys at the top are lighter than the ones at the bottom. What's even better is that the keys are designed to mimic the feel of ivory and ebony keys.

Sound quality and versatility

The integrated Acoustic Intelligent Resonator technology offers multi-dimensional sound production. It allows you to obtain sound combinations, which would otherwise be difficult to achieve in a small room. Casio also installed 2 8W speakers, making the piano a great concert instrument. You benefit from 18 sounds, five of which are Grand Piano sounds i.e. Classic, Concert, Mellow, Modern and Bright. The sounds are well crafted and quite phenomenal.

Connectivity

The PX-160 is pretty standard in the connectivity department. It has two stereo mini-jacks for headphones, two 0.25" audio outs for an external amplifier as well as a MIDI cable for attaching a tablet, computer or other devices. There is also a 2-track recorder that you can use for recording composed music.

Other features

The Duet Mode allows you to split the keyboard into two smaller ones that have the same range and timbre. This makes it possible for two people to play at the same time, hence a great learning tool.

Split Mode simply splits the keyboard into two zones, allowing you to play piano with the right hand and bass with the left.

The lightweight construction is one of the features that make this a favorite piano for many. It is easy to transport that most and to make things more interesting, the piano is available in a champagne gold or black finish.

Rating

Design

4.5

Performance

5

Construction

4

Value for the Money

4

User Satisfaction

5

Alternatives 

Casio PX-360

Casio PX-360

This is PX-160's big brother and comes with advanced features. It has a Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action keyboard, powerful effect system, 550 tones as well as Acoustic and Intelligent Resonator. While it doesn't have speakers, you can use the 5.3" touch screen display to explore different sounds.

Comparison

Casio PX-360

550 tones

128 polyphony tones

5.3" touch screen display

200 built-in rhythms

Casio PX-160

18 tones

128 polyphony notes

No screen display

280W speakers

Yamaha P115

Yamaha P115

There are many similarities between the Casio PX-160 and Yamaha P115. The latter is more pristine and offers a cleaner tone. However, this is a matter of personal preference. Both have 88-weighted keys. The P115 bundle comes with a height-adjustable seat, which isn't the case with the PX-160. Where the P115 has a Graded Hammer Action keyboard, the PX160 has a Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard.

Comparison

Yamaha P115

192 note polyphony

Intelligent Acoustic Control

Graded Hammer Action keyboard

Height-adjustable seat

Casio PX-160

128 polyphony notes

Acoustic Intelligent Resonator

Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard

Seat has fixed height

Casio PX760

Casio PX760

This is an advanced piano that offers a pure playing experience. It offers 88 weighted keys and a variety of essential tones for versatility. It weighs nearly 70 pounds, making it almost impossible to transport. Like the PX160, it has the AiR sound engine. Other similarities include 128-note polyphony, Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer action II keyboard and 18 different tones.

Comparison

Casio PX760

128 polyphony notes

18 tones

Air sound engine

Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard

Casio PX-160

128 polyphony notes

18 tones

Air sound engine

Tri-Sensor Scaled Hammer Action II keyboard

Final Thoughts

It isn't easy to find fault this piano in terms of construction, sound or even aesthetics. It is an exceptional product that represents the true meaning of value for money. The piano combines amateur-grade and professional-grade features exceptionally, making it a great instrument for all levels of experience. If you need any more information on choosing the best beginner piano, then you can always visit our site.

Stephanie Su
 

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