Alesis Coda Pro 88-Key Digital Piano Review

Intermediate digital pianos are a popular choice for people who want to learn to play piano in a compact and portable format. They also offer recording tools, accompaniment features, and other benefits. The Alesis Coda Pro is a classic midrange digital keyboards piano that is worth further examination.

Things To Consider Before Buying A Digital Keyboards Piano

Digital pianos can cost from $100 up to $5000 and above, so you need to set your budget ahead of time. There are many different brands and models on the market and it is tempting to want to upgrade your target when you see a slightly more expensive one in the suggested products list. Stick to your budget and your needs.

The Alesis Coda Pro

The Alesis Coda Pro costs $500, which puts it right at the lower end of the intermediate digital piano market. It has a balance of straight piano tools and general playing and recording features at a lower price than most of its rivals. The Coda Pro comes with sustain pedal, but no stand, base, or headphones.

  • Good value for money
  • Rich feature set
  • Easy to change options
  • Doesn't come with stand or bench
  • Key weighting not the most accurate

Features and Benefits

Sound

Alesis Coda Pro 88-Key Digital Piano

The Coda Pro has 20 voices from different instruments. You can add chorus or reverb or change the EQ to customize the tone. There are also 60 accompaniment sounds to use for creating backgrounds, fills, intros, outros, and other elements. You can control all of this from the buttons on the top of the unit. The range of effects is larger than it is on other intermediate digital pianos. There are also included lessons for all skill levels.

Access

On the one hand, $500 seems like a lot to pay for a digital piano. On the other hand, there are much more expensive and potentially more rewarding options that run into the thousands. This all makes the instrument usually accessible. It is also easy to play, with clearly labeled buttons and a manual that lays out how everything works. The major missing pieces are a stand and bench, and you are likely to need at least the stand. However, the instrument is very portable and easy to transport in this form.

Extra Features

There are plenty of additional features that make the Coda Pro great. It can do splitting and layering of sound, record music to its onboard memory, and download more virtual instruments to use as voices. There is a built-in metronome and a transposition function. It has a USB MIDI port for connecting other instruments if desired. It has a headphone and stereo outs to use depending on what kind of playback you want and what environment you live in. The Coda Pro has suitable features for solo practice, learning along with a teacher, performance in a venue, or just playing at home for fun.

Design

4

Performance

5

Construction

4

Value for the Money

5

User Satisfaction

4

Alternatives

Yamaha YPG-535

Yamaha YPG-535

Yamaha is one of the strongest brands in the digital piano space. Their offerings tend to go heavy on features, and the YPG-535 is no exception. It has an automated accompaniment tool called the Performance Assistant that automatically uses the included voices and styles to build a band around your tempo and genre. The Yamaha Education Suite has many learning tools. The YPG-535 comes with over 350 voices and 100 premade songs with the ability to download more. It costs $500.

Comparison

Yamaha YPG-535

Price: $500

Voices: 371

Features: Splitting, layering, Performance Assistant, Yamaha Education Suite

Alesis Coda Pro

Price: $500

Voices: 20

Features: Splitting, layering, accompaniment

Korg B1SP

Korg B1SP

The Korg B1SP takes a different approach from the Yamaha listed above. Rather than fill the instrument with features, Korg has opted to take the narrow path of creating a solid piano experience. The B1SP has eight voices spread across different types of pianos, organs, and harpsichords. It has weighted keys to provide a more realistic key action, two speakers, and a set of three pedals just like a piano. It costs $570. It is best for someone who wants to concentrate on practicing the piano.

Comparison

Korb B1SP

Price: $570

Voices: 8

Features: Speaker Pair, Pedals, Weighted Keys

Alesis Coda Pro

Price: $500

Voices: 20

Features: Splitting, layering, accompaniment

Yamaha P71

Yamaha P71

The Yamaha P71 is a less expensive alternative choice. It costs $400 and does not have a stand or bench. The P71 is capable of splitting and layering, or both, and it has 10 voices. It is also especially small and light, so it is well-suited to practice on the road or in a cramped space like an apartment.

Comparison

Yamaha P71

Price: $400

Voices: 10

Features: Splitting, layering, portability

Alesis Coda Pro

Price: $500

Voices: 20

Features: Splitting, layering, accompaniment

Final Thoughts

The Alesis Coda Pro is an example of an intermediate digital piano that provides a good number of features, a solid sound set, and a well-designed interface. It doesn't have any particularly unique features, but it does tend to be cheaper than most of the other models that offer these same options. It works well for practicing on your own or working with a student or teacher using the split function. There are a lot of intermediate guitars that offer good value, so check out our alternatives as well for some other perspectives. The price point means it may be too expensive for a first-time user, but it's a reasonable purchase for anyone looking for a long-term solution that won't break the bank and still has good features. For more information on this keyboard piano and other brand, you can read our blog post hereAnd for other digital piano, you can view it here.

Stephanie Su
 

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