An Introduction to Chords in the Key of A Sharp Minor

Who knew that Elton John’s “Can You Feel the Love Tonight,” Katy Perry’s “Roar,” and Prince’s “Purple Rain” have something in common?

They do: specifically, the key of A sharp [1].

There’s a whole lot you can do with the A sharp minor scale. Chords are just one of them. Here, we’re covering all the chords of A sharp minor, how to play them, and a few fun things you can do with them.

The Chords of A Sharp Minor

A piano chord is a group of three or four notes played simultaneously [2]. A triad is a group of three notes, and a seventh is a group of four [3].

Before you know the chords of A sharp minor, you need to know the notes of the A sharp minor scale. They are, in order: A#, B#, C#, D#, E#, F#, and G#.

Isn’t it nice when you get a scale that’s easy to remember?

The even better news for new pianists is that chords are constructed from the notes of the scale, and chords for a given scale can only contain the notes of that particular scale.

So, with that in mind, the chords of A sharp minor are:

  • i – A# minor, A# minor 7th
  • iidim – B# diminished, B# minor 7th flat five
  • III – C# major, C# major 7th
  • iv – D# minor, D# minor 7th
  • v – E# minor, E# minor 7th
  • VI – F# major, F# major 7th
  • VII – G# major, G# dominant 7th

It’s a lot simpler than the notation would have you believe. It refers to the four types of chords: major, minor, diminished, and augmented [4].

Spelled out, the notes of the chords are:

  • A# minor: A#, C#, E#
  • A# minor 7th: A#, C#, E#, G#
  • B# diminished: B#, D#, F#,
  • B# minor 7th flat five: B#, D#, F#, A#
  • C# major: C#, E#, G#
  • C# major 7th: C#, E#, G#, B#
  • D# minor: D#, F#, A#
  • D# minor 7th: D#, F#, A#, C#
  • E# minor: E#, G#, B#
  • E# minor 7th: E#, G#, B#, D#
  • F# major: F#, A#, C#
  • F# major 7th: F#, A#, C#, E#
  • G# major: G#, B#, D#
  • G# dominant 7th: G#, B#, D#, F#

If it all looks terribly confusing, remember that the chords only contain the notes of the scale.

Fingerings

With all of this in mind, how do you actually play these chords on the keyboard?

Start with the basic A# minor chord (A#, C#, and E#). In this chord, A# is what’s known as the root note, the first note of the chord and the note for which it is named [5].

Let’s start with the right hand. In root position, your first finger/thumb plays A#, your third/middle finger plays C#, and your fifth/pinky finger plays E#.

If you want to play with your left hand, the order of your fingers is reversed. Your fifth/pinky finger plays A#, your third/middle finger plays C#, and your thumb plays E#.

Inversions

Once you know the fingering for the root position, you can start playing with some inversions.

Basically, inversions are created by shifting the order of the notes. You do this by moving your hand up and down the keyboard as needed.

Start with your right hand in root position at A#, C#, and E#. The first inversion of the A# minor chord is C#, F#, and A#. So, to play the inversion, simply shift your hand so that your thumb plays C# and your fifth finger plays A#.

The second inversion (F#, A#, C#) works the same way–just shift your hand so your thumb plays F# and lay the rest of your fingers appropriately.

Discovering More Chords

Think you’re ready to master the A sharp minor chord? Don’t forget to study the C sharp minor scale.

If not, no worries. Read our blog for more tips and tricks to master the entire keyboard.

Stephanie Su
 

Started learning music when she was four years old, Stephanie is a music teacher and a music therapist who is highly proficient in Piano, Violin, Guitar, and Ukulele. She likes to learn, teach, and share her music playing experiences.

Click Here to Leave a Comment Below 0 comments

Leave a Reply: