7 Guitar Chords for Beginners with Frets

They say the first step in any journey is the hardest, and this is too true when it comes to learning a new instrument. It makes sense, a total lack of knowledge in anything can feel overwhelming at first. Especially if this is your first time learning an instrument, it’s hard to know where to start.

Take the guitar for example. Six strings and what can feel like an endless sequence of frets. You won’t become a George Harrison or Keith Richards overnight!

Start your journey by learning guitar chords for beginners with frets. Keep reading and you’ll be playing in front of open mic nights at your local cafe in no time.

Major Chords vs. Minor Chords

If you’ve been exposed to music theory in any form in life, then you’ve probably heard the words “major” and “minor” thrown around before. If you haven’t heard of them, spoiler alert they are pretty important to understand when it comes to playing the guitar.

Don’t worry, when you hear them, you’ll understand the difference.

Major chords will sound bright, or happy. Minor chords will sound depressing or melancholy. There is obviously more to it than that, but as a beginner, this is a great place to start.

7 Guitar Chords for Beginners with Frets

Starting out, pressing down on the strings can be really hard on your fingers before calluses are built up. As a result, it can be hard to produce a great sound let alone transition between chords quickly.

Watch the video for you to better understand about guitar chords:

In this list of seven beginner chords, you’ll get the classic fingering as well as a more basic version. You’ll get the idea of what the chord will sound like, and it will be easier for you to transition between chords.

1. Let’s Start with ‘A’ Major

While this chord is fairly basic, the most challenging aspect would definitely be squeezing three fingers onto one fret.

In the classic version of this chord you would put your fourth finger on the B string (second string), your third finger on the G string (third string), and your second finger on the D string (fourth string). All three of which you would put on the second fret.

A simpler version to start with is called A suspended; in layman’s terms, this means a third of the chord is omitted. For short we’ll call it A sus. A sus is simply your third finger on the G string (third string), and your second finger on the D string (fourth string).

When you strum this chord, don’t hit the E string (sixth string). It’s not meant to be played with this chord.

2. ‘B’ Is a Major Pain

If you were to read the how this chord is supposed to go down, your head would probably explode from confusion.

Instead, let’s substitute it with a B minor chord. For this chord, plant your third finger on the B string (third string) and your second finger on the A string (fifth string).

Now, this is a MINOR chord, not a major chord. Take note of how sad it sounds compared to the A Major chord.

For your strum, also skip hitting the E string!

3. Now You ‘C’ It

C is one of the most common guitar chords for beginners with frets, and also one of the more complicated ones to get right.

The toughest part about this chord for starting out is how it’s stretched over three frets. Your first finger is on the B string (second string) in the first fret, while your second finger is on the D string (fourth string) in the second fret, and finally, your third finger is on the A string (fifth string) in the third fret.

Phew!

Make it easy on yourself and start out with a C Major 7 chord instead. It’s basically the same chord, except you don’t have to worry about your first finger finding the B string. Only your second and third on the D and A strings respectively.

Again, don’t play the E string with this chord.

4. No ‘D’ But Today

Of all the guitar chords for beginners with frets, this is one of the more basic chords. If you’re looking for a chord to build your guitar mastery confidence, it would be this one.

All you do is place your first finger on the G string, your second finger on the e string (both on the second fret), and your third finger on the B string on the third fret. Your fingers should make a nice, little triangle. It’s really that simple!

The only catch? Don’t play the E OR A string with this chord.

5. An ‘E’ For Effort

For this chord put your first finger on the G string on the first fret, your second finger on the A string, and your third finger on the D string (both on the second fret).

If you need to simplify this chord, then play the E7 instead and remove the third finger from the D string.

Bonus, this is the first chord where you can strum every single string when you play it!

6. What the ‘F’?

This is another one of the trickier ones.

Instead of trying to explain barre chords, learn the F Major 7.

Stil a bit more challenging for a beginner, this variation of the F chord stretches over three frets. Your first finger goes on the B string on the first fret, your second finger on the G string on the second fret, and your third finger on the D string on the third fret.

Similar to the D chord, you won’t be strumming the E or A strings with this chord.

7. Like a ‘G6’

For the final chord, you will be learning the G Major Chord, rather a variant called the G6.

For this variation of the G chord, put your first finger on the A string on the second fret, and your second finger on the E string on the third fret.

For this chord, play all the strings when you strum.

Your Music Advisor

Everyone is going to learn at their own pace. Give yourself time to practice and grow. Focus more on getting comfortable with strumming and transitioning between chords when you start.

Start by practicing with these seven guitar chords for beginners with frets every day for ten minutes.

One year from now, you’ll be surprised by how much you’ve grown! And if you have questions, ask away in the comments section below.

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